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General Orthopedic Surgery

No Matter Where It Hurts

General orthopedics treats the entire spectrum of musculoskeletal problems. Fractures, arthritis, strains, sprains, tendonitis, and beyond. Our team of general orthopedists provides innovative care tailored to each patient’s unique anatomy and needs. Using the latest in surgical and none-surgical treatments, they eliminate pain and restore both mobility and your quality of life.

What Do General Orthopedic Surgeons Treat?

Your Hands

The hands, similar to your feet, are a base of everything we do. From working to sipping that morning cup of coffee, our hands allow us to perform tasks that range from simple to complex. Degeneration and pain can bring our lives to a screeching halt and that’s where we come in. Alleviating pain and restoring normal function are main focuses that determine course of treatment.

Your Hips

The hip joint connects the pelvis with the legs. It is a ball and socket joint with the ball on top of the femur (thigh bone) and the socket in the pelvis. It allows for twisting, bending, and back and forth motions. Reaching down to the floor and putting on your socks and shoes require a nearly normal range of motion of the hips.

Walking, running, and most other upright activities can be painful if the hip is damaged, and even sitting for long periods and sleeping can be disrupted by a diseased hip. Strong muscles connecting the pelvis to the femur power the hip joint and are also subject to injury. Ongoing research into hip joint mechanics and various injuries is leading to more options for treating this large and important joint.

Your Knees

Walking, running, and most other upright activities can be painful if the hip is damaged, and even sitting for long periods and sleeping can be disrupted by a diseased hip. Strong muscles connecting the pelvis to the femur power the hip joint and are also subject to injury. Ongoing research into hip joint mechanics and various injuries is leading to more options for treating this large and important joint.

Your Shoulders

The shoulder is the most mobile joint in the body, and is the most dependent on soft tissue balance for stability. Trauma or age-related degeneration can cause pain or disability in any part of the shoulder. Treatment of shoulder pathology, ranging from physical therapy to surgical reconstruction, is often successful in relieving pain and restoring function.

The shoulder girdle is composed of three joints and one articulation:

  • Sternoclavicular joint
  • Acromioclavicular joint
  • Glenohumeral joint (the shoulder joint)
  • Scapulothoracic articulation

General Orthopedic Surgery Team